I’m so sorry

I haven’t been doing art stuff this week because:

1. College semester started.

2. I’m sick with some sort of chest cold and a 100 F fever (since Sunday, so you can imagine the amount of energy i spent just going to classes).

I have quite a few things I want to put up on here and youtube that’s related to art but I’m waiting until after I get better. 

anatomicalart:

briannacherrygarcia:

itscourtoon:

bathsabbath:

thorhugs:

compactcarl:

egriz:

im not even an artist and these prices are hurting my feelings 

This is what I have to dig through every time I look for new jobs to apply for.

For non-artists, let’s give you a little perspective.

For me, an illustration takes a bare minimum of 6 hours. Mind you, that’s JUST the drawing part. Not the research, or the communications, or gathering information. Just drawing.

That’s if it’s a simple illustration.

My art deco or more detailed stuff can take 20+ hours each.

Even simple, cartoony things still take at least 3 hours.

Let’s go with the second one. 2 illustrations for $25. Figuring 6 hours each. 12 hours total, for JUST the drawings. That’s approximately $2.08/hour. 

Asking these prices is an insult. But what’s even more hurtful is there are people out there that will take these jobs. Which only encourages rates like this to be acceptable. And there are people who will try to say these are just what you have to do to get started.

I believed that. So my first coloring gigs were just $10/page. The day someone offered me $25/page for just flatting work, I realized just how wrong I’d been. I’m still not making the rates I’d like, but now I refuse anything below $25/page. Because there is value in my time.

In any standardized industry, even ones that pay piece rate over hourly, these numbers are criminal.

Do your fellow artists a favor. Never accept jobs like these. There are others that pay legitimate rates. Or at least closer to legitimate.

Such baby bullshit. Don’t even get out of bed for these rates.

    If you are an artist who wants to make money off their art, I highly suggest you buy The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook. It goes in depth about copyright issues and even contains contract and model release templates. The 2013 book *I believe* states the average professional charges $72 an hour. This article calculated that to make a 40k annual salary you would need to charge about $60 per hour.

  After graduating from Art Center in 2012, I think I asked for somewhere between $35-45 an hour and got laughed at by multiple big name clients, which was infuriating, sadly expected, and terrifying with over $100K worth of student loans staring me in the face. If they tell you it will be “great exposure” that’s a red flag. Ask yourself how their exposure can compare to your Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr and Facebook pages combined? 

And when you do get a decent paying gig, PROTECT YOURSELF. You have the right to negotiate and revise a contract. Do not start a job until you have a contract signed. If they don’t provide you with one, MAKE ONE. And make sure you have your bases covered. You can specify in a contract that maybe two revisions are included in your cost, and if they ask you to revise the piece more than twice, they will have to pay extra. In terms of payment schedule, I usually do the 50/50 Method (50% before, 50% after) or the 3/3/3 Method (1/3 before, 1/3 in the middle, 1/3 after all work has been received). Both of those are pretty standard in the industry, as they guarantee you will get compensated for your time, even if the job goes bad.

Remember you have a skill, and you have spent time honing that skill and you deserve to be adequately paid for that time and effort. You will have clients dismiss you because, honest to God they think, “Well, I could do that if I wanted. Hell, my five year old does it now.” No they can’t, because they didn’t, they don’t, they won’t and they probably never will. And good luck hiring a five year old. They can’t keep a fucking deadline.

And in a last ditch effort they’ll say, “But that drawing only took you an hour!” Son, that drawing took me 20. fucking. years.

10 Dollars for 1 minute of animation.  Oh my god my heart.  It took my team 6 months and a team of 12 to make a 4 minute short. 

The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook

I second this book! I’ve had it for several years now, and it’s been a HUGE help in my work as a freelance artist. It gives great advice on what to charge for different areas of art!

Please remember. Your art is worth a respectable payment! Accepting ridiculously low prices actually hurts the arts/illustration/animation communities because it makes employers believe they can employ people without offering decent pay.


Check the internet if you need help figuring out what you should be charging for your commissions. Invest in the books that will inform you professionally, and put your foot down if you think someone is trying to cheat you out of your time and hard work.
You have a right to refuse a job, and/or request decent payment. If your employer denies a you decent pay, well then they’re probably not a very good employer.
Do not undersell your skills. it is bad for the art community and you are worth more then that.

Sleepy sleepy sleepy… also I got a chest cold on Sunday so the passed few days have been miserable for me, especially during college. Hoping I get better soon…

Sleepy sleepy sleepy… also I got a chest cold on Sunday so the passed few days have been miserable for me, especially during college. Hoping I get better soon…

literaryreference:

ihavealotoffeelings:

cecilbaldwin-fan:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

Some people took offense with this on Twitter. But as a writer struggling with anxiety, I’d say: if you’re not ready to submit without apologizing for your work, you are not ready to submit. 
Never apologize for your work. 

I think he comes off a little harsh here but I also think it’s genuinely good advice. I’m no stranger to the “everything I make is terrible” brain weasels, but seriously, don’t say that to someone you’re submitting your work to professionally. I mean, would you roll up to a job interview and say “hey, I’m probably not very qualified for this job, but consider hiring me anyway”? I’m gonna go ahead and say you would probably not.
Fake it til you make it if you have to. Tell the voice in your head that tells you that thing you made is terrible that YOU may have no choice but to listen to its bullshit, but you’re not going to make anyone else listen to its bullshit. I know it’s not easy, but work at it anyway.

I don’t think it comes off as harsh at all—I work in publishing and this is pretty standard wisdom. You wouldn’t do this applying for a job in any other field, regardless of how you actually felt about your abilities; it’s not different just because you’re an artist.

literaryreference:

ihavealotoffeelings:

cecilbaldwin-fan:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

Some people took offense with this on Twitter. But as a writer struggling with anxiety, I’d say: if you’re not ready to submit without apologizing for your work, you are not ready to submit. 

Never apologize for your work. 

I think he comes off a little harsh here but I also think it’s genuinely good advice. I’m no stranger to the “everything I make is terrible” brain weasels, but seriously, don’t say that to someone you’re submitting your work to professionally. I mean, would you roll up to a job interview and say “hey, I’m probably not very qualified for this job, but consider hiring me anyway”? I’m gonna go ahead and say you would probably not.

Fake it til you make it if you have to. Tell the voice in your head that tells you that thing you made is terrible that YOU may have no choice but to listen to its bullshit, but you’re not going to make anyone else listen to its bullshit. I know it’s not easy, but work at it anyway.

I don’t think it comes off as harsh at all—I work in publishing and this is pretty standard wisdom. You wouldn’t do this applying for a job in any other field, regardless of how you actually felt about your abilities; it’s not different just because you’re an artist.

vincentvillella:

As an art student, you’re hit over the head repeatedly with Renaissance art, so I’ve gotten a little tired of it, but something I’m not tired of is the seemingly impossible naturalistic detail attained from stone and a chisel back then.

(Source: vasilisablue)

erinburr:

tiny-librarian:

A Pennsylvania museum has solved the mystery of a Renaissance portrait in an investigation that spans hundreds of years, layers of paint and the murdered daughter of an Italian duke.

Among the works featured in the Carnegie Museum’s exhibit Faked, Forgotten, Found is a portrait of Isabella de’Medici, the spirited favorite daughter of Cosimo de’Medici, the first Grand Duke of Florence, whose face hadn’t seen the light of day in almost 200 years.

Isabella Medici’s strong nose, steely stare and high forehead plucked of hair, as was the fashion in 1570, was hidden beneath layers of paint applied by a Victorian artist to render the work more saleable to a 19th century buyer.

The result was a pretty, bland face with rosy cheeks and gently smiling lips that Louise Lippincott, curator of fine arts at the museum, thought was a possible fake.

Before deciding to deaccession the work, Lippincott brought the painting, which was purportedly of Eleanor of Toledo, a famed beauty and the mother of Isabella de’Medici, to the Pittsburgh museum’s conservator Ellen Baxter to confirm her suspicions.

Baxter was immediately intrigued. The woman’s clothing was spot-on, with its high lace collar and richly patterned bodice, but her face was all wrong, ‘like a Victorian cookie tin box lid,’ Baxter told Carnegie Magazine.

After finding the stamp of Francis Needham on the back of the work, Baxter did some research and found that Needham worked in National Portrait Gallery in London in the mid-1800s transferring paintings from wood panels to canvas mounts.

Paintings on canvas usually have large cracks, but the ones on the Eleanor of Toledo portrait were much smaller than would be expected.

Baxter devised a theory that the work had been transferred from a wood panel onto canvas and then repainted so that the woman’s face was more pleasing to the Victorian art-buyer, some 300 years after it had been painted.

Source/Read More

Behind every Victorian cookie tin box lid is a badass woman that someone wants to paint over and sell.

plays

Just a couple of updates! I hit 100 subscribers on Youtube!

Progress of my drawing of #Arno :) I love it so far #ACUnity #assassinscreed #arnodorian #art #drawing #coloredpencil

Progress of my drawing of #Arno :) I love it so far #ACUnity #assassinscreed #arnodorian #art #drawing #coloredpencil

Progress of my #Arno drawing :) #ACUnity #assassinscreed #arnodorian #art #drawing #coloredpencil

Progress of my #Arno drawing :) #ACUnity #assassinscreed #arnodorian #art #drawing #coloredpencil

Progress of my #Arno drawing :) #ACUnity #assassinscreed #arnodorian #art #drawing #coloredpencil

Progress of my #Arno drawing :) #ACUnity #assassinscreed #arnodorian #art #drawing #coloredpencil

I love my eraser pencil, very useful art tool. Highly recommended.

I love my eraser pencil, very useful art tool. Highly recommended.

It seems to be tradition for me to take a waking up picture when I’m here.

It seems to be tradition for me to take a waking up picture when I’m here.

Progress of my drawing of #Arno starting out good so far! #ACUnity #assassinscreed #arnodorian #art #drawing

Progress of my drawing of #Arno starting out good so far! #ACUnity #assassinscreed #arnodorian #art #drawing

Starting a drawing of #Arno from #ACUnity , this will be fun! #assassinscreed #arnodorian

Starting a drawing of #Arno from #ACUnity , this will be fun! #assassinscreed #arnodorian

The lake is a mirror #nature #vacation

The lake is a mirror #nature #vacation